Boosters


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IF YOU RECEIVED PFIZER

Everyone age 5 and older should get a booster at least 5 months after completing their Pfizer vaccination series. Individuals age 5–17 years old can get a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster. Adults 18 years and older can get either of the mRNA vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) as a booster dose.

Individuals 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised and adults 50 years and older who are not moderately or severely immunocompromised may choose to receive a second mRNA booster 4 months after their first booster dose. In addition, people 18-49 who are not moderately or severely immunocompromised who received the Janssen vaccine for both primary and booster doses may receive a second mRNA booster dose 4 months after the first J&J/Janssen booster.

People who are moderately to severely immunocompromised should consult with their specialty provider about timing and dosage of vaccines.


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IF YOU RECEIVED MODERNA

Everyone age 18 and older should get a booster at least 5 months after completing their initial Moderna vaccination series. The CDC prefers either of the mRNA vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) as a booster dose.

Individuals 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised and adults 50 years and older who are not moderately or severely immunocompromised may choose to receive a second mRNA booster 4 months after their first booster dose. In addition, people 18-49 who are not moderately or severely immunocompromised who received the Janssen vaccine for both primary and booster doses may receive a second mRNA booster dose 4 months after the first J&J/Janssen booster.

People who are moderately to severely immunocompromised should consult with their specialty provider about timing and dosage of vaccines.


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IF YOU RECEIVED J&J

Everyone age 18 and older should receive a booster dose at least 2 months after receiving their J&J/Janssen COVID-19 vaccine. The CDC prefers either of the mRNA vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) as a booster dose.

Individuals 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised and adults 50 years and older who are not moderately or severely immunocompromised may choose to receive a second mRNA booster 4 months after their first booster dose. In addition, people 18-49 who are not moderately or severely immunocompromised who received the Janssen vaccine for both primary and booster doses may receive a second mRNA booster dose 4 months after the first J&J/Janssen booster.

People who are moderately to severely immunocompromised should consult with their specialty provider about timing and dosage of vaccines.


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WHERE TO RECEIVE A BOOSTER DOSE

There is ample supply across the city among providers to meet demand for booster doses. Use the City’s Vaccine Finder to locate a nearby vaccination site. 

 


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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

For individuals who received a Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, everyone age 5 and older is eligible to receive a booster at 5 months or more after their initial series.

For individuals who received a Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, everyone age 18 or older is eligible to receive a booster at 5 months or more after their initial series.

For individuals who received the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, booster shots are recommended for those who are 18 and older and were vaccinated 2 or more months ago.

Individuals 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised and adults 50 years and older who are not moderately or severely immunocompromised may choose to receive a second mRNA booster 4 months after their first booster dose. In addition, people 18-49 who are not moderately or severely immunocompromised who received the Janssen vaccine for both primary and booster doses may receive a second mRNA booster dose 4 months after the first J&J Janssen booster. Learn more about second booster doses here.

People who are moderately to severely immunocompromised should consult with their specialty provider about timing and dosage of vaccines.

Vaccine booster doses can provide extra protection against COVID-19, especially for those who are most vulnerable to serious illness, including seniors and people with underlying health conditions. Booster doses do a good job of ​strengthening protection against COVID-19​ ​that may have started to wane after initial vaccination. 

Chicagoans can get a booster dose at sites across the city – in hospitals, physicians’ offices, local pharmacies, through Protect Chicago At Home, at pop-up clinics hosted by the City, and more. There is ample supply across the city among providers to meet demand for booster doses. Use the City’s Vaccine Finder to locate a nearby vaccination site. 

No, all three COVID-19 vaccines continue to be very effective in preventing hospitalization and death from COVID-19. However, the CDC has said the protection provided by the vaccine could wane over time, especially among those in the oldest age groups or who have underlying medical conditions.

This depends on the vaccine. Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson booster doses are the same as the initial vaccine doses. For Moderna, it is half the dose of the vaccine people get for their initial series.

Individuals age 5 and older should get a Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster. Individuals 18 years and older may choose among any of the COVID-19 vaccines as a booster dose. Some people may have a preference for the vaccine type that they originally received and others may prefer to get a different booster. CDC’s recommendations now allow for this type of mix and match dosing for booster shots.

COVID-19 vaccines are available for everyone at no cost, including the booster shot. Vaccines will continue to be given to all eligible people living in Chicago, regardless of insurance or immigration status.

Individuals can self-report that they are eligible and receive a booster dose wherever vaccines are offered. This will help ensure there are not additional barriers to access for this vulnerable population receiving their booster.

No. At this time, people are still considered fully vaccinated two weeks after their second dose in a 2-dose series, such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or two weeks after a single-dose vaccine, such as the J&J/Janssen vaccine.

Yes, if a patient is eligible, both flu and COVID-19 vaccines can be administered at the same visit, as recommended by CDC and ACIP. In addition to flu vaccine, COVID-19 vaccine can be given with other vaccines as well.