For Individuals

My COVID-19 Vaccine: When, Where, and How

Everyone 65 and older in Chicago is eligible not only for their initial COVID-19 vaccine series, but booster doses as well. Learn more here.

In-home vaccination is now available to all Chicago residents. Call (312) 746-4835 or click here to schedule an appointment for in-home vaccination. All City-run vaccination sites are accessible to people with disabilities. At the time of registration for an appointment at a City-run vaccination site you will be able to request accommodations.

IDPH, in collaboration with the Illinois Deaf and Hard of Hearing Commission, has designed a COVID-19 Vaccine Communication Card. The card was designed to help Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and DeafBlind persons communicate with COVID-19 vaccine providers during an appointment. 

 

Click here for additional resources for people with Autism seeking a COVID-19 vaccination.

In-home vaccination is now available to all Chicago residents. Call (312) 746-4835 or click here to schedule an appointment for in-home vaccination.

All Chicagoans 18+ can now get vaccinated against COVID-19. The best way to get vaccinated against COVID-19 is by calling your doctor, health clinic, community health center, or hospital where you receive primary healthcare services. If you do not have a healthcare provider, go to Zocdoc.com/vaccine (the City’s vaccine appointment tool) or Chicago.gov/VaccineFinder to find a vaccine provider nearby.

Only the Pfizer vaccine has been authorized for use in individuals age 12 to 17. Chicagoans age 12-17 are able to receive vaccination only at sites offering Pfizer vaccine. Learn more here

The Pfizer vaccine is now authorized for children ages 5-to-11 after months of testing. Learn more about the vaccine and where to get vaccinated here.

COVID-19 vaccines are not currently available only to those under the age of 5. Clinical testing is underway.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the COVID-19 vaccination for all people aged 12 years and older, including people who are pregnant, recently pregnant (including those who are lactating), who are trying to get pregnant now, or who might become pregnant in the future. CDC strongly recommends COVID-19 vaccination either before or during pregnancy because the benefits of vaccination outweigh known or potential risks. 

Healthcare providers should strongly recommend that people who are pregnant, recently pregnant (including those who are lactating), who are trying to become pregnant now, or who might become pregnant in the future receive one of the authorized or approved COVID-19 vaccines as soon as possible. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the COVID-19 vaccinationfor all people 12 years and older, including people who are breastfeeding.

COVID-19 vaccines cannot cause infection in anyone, including the mother or the baby, and the vaccines are effective at preventing COVID-19 in people who are breastfeeding. Recent reports have shown that breastfeeding people who have received mRNA COVID-19 vaccines have antibodies in their breastmilk, which could help protect their babies. More data are needed to determine what protection these antibodies may provide to the baby.