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Chicago Blueprint for Fair Housing

Bringing Equity to Housing Choice in Chicago

Chicago’s residential segregation and fair housing challenges are driven by the root causes of systemic racism and poverty. Community conversations and extensive data analysis confirm that barriers to housing today perpetuate Chicago’s residential segregation, creating a cycle of instability with longlasting consequences that not only impact individuals, but the entire city.

Building on these findings of fair housing challenges, City and community partners collectively identified historic policies and decisions, as well as root causes, that can inform future action. Together, the City of Chicago, led by the Department of Housing, Commission on Human Relations, Office of the Mayor with additional agencies involved in implementation, and the CHA will focus their affirmative fair housing work on eight goals with complementary strategies and actions.

What is Fair Housing?

Fair Housing means the right for a person to live where they choose to, free from discrimination. In the City of Chicago, the law that governs fair housing is the Chicago Fair Housing Ordinance (CFHO) enforced by the Chicago Commission on Human Relations (CCHR). The CFHO prohibits discrimination based on race, sex, color, age, religion, disability, national origin, ancestry, parental status, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, military status, and source of income.

Even with one of the strongest fair housing ordinances in the country, discrimination and segregation continue to limit housing opportunities for many Chicago residents. Far too many real estate agents, landlords, and property managers lack an understanding of the CFHO, or hazard to ignore the law to the detriment of many individuals and families.

Reports

Victim of Discrimination

If you feel you have been a victim of discrimination or would like to obtain additional information about the Chicago fair housing laws, please contact the Commission on Human Relations at www.chicago.gov/cchr, or call 312.744.4111.