September 17, 2019

Mayor Lightfoot Joins the Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events to Preview the 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial

“…and other such stories” explores how Chicago can imagine its future by examining its architectural past.
Mayor's Press Office    312.744.3334

CHICAGO - Mayor Lori E. Lightfoot today joined the Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events and others to preview the third annual Chicago Architecture Biennial. This year’s biennial, titled ...and other such stories, explores the way architecture shapes, and is shaped by, culture, history, and nature around the world, asking critical questions about how architecture has informed our present, and the power that architecture has to shape a better, more sustainable, and more equitable future.

“The Biennial represents a special time for the city, when residents, visitors, cultural organizations, and businesses all come together to celebrate and explore our shared histories and envision new possibilities for the future,” said Mayor Lightfoot.  “Chicago is an ideal location to engage in the emotionally challenging conversations that architecture sparks and explore what our future could look like when we reflect and understand our past.”

“Biennials offer a unique opportunity both to reflect on the state of the field and to commission new work that pushes on the boundaries of where we are and looks towards where we are going,” noted Yesomi Umolu, Graham Foundation Artistic Director, Chicago Architecture Biennial. “Our goal with ...and other such stories was to find inspiration in the built environment of Chicago that would spur a conversation and exploration globally on how architecture reflects and influences our experiences, rights, memories, and aspirations.  We are excited to present the projects the contributors created and continue this conversation with citizens of all ages in Chicago and visitors to the city.”

The Chicago Architecture Biennial brings together more than 80 contributors from over 20 countries with works that reflect on architecture as it relates to social, political, and environmental issues worldwide, including issues around property and social housing, the division of natural resources, and systems of power and civil rights. In addition to the main venue at the Chicago Cultural Center, visitors can explore these stories at over 40 partner sites and 100 partner organizations across Chicago, including Overton Elementary School, the National Public Housing Museum, Jane Addams Hull-House Museum, and Garfield Park.

“Chicago truly comes together for the Biennial, and we are grateful both for the partnership of so many terrific organizations across the city, and for the generous support provided to the Biennial by corporations, foundations, and individuals.  Each edition of the Biennial has evolved to bring the world to Chicago, and Chicago to the world, in a new and different light, and we are looking forward to seeing how the exhibition grows and expands through visitors to the Chicago Cultural Center, programs with partners, and educational initiatives throughout the city,” said Jack Guthman, Chairman of the Chicago Architecture Biennial.

The Biennial is free and will be open to the public beginning on Thursday, September 19, and will be on view both in its main venue, the historic Chicago Cultural Center (78 E Washington St, Chicago, IL 60602), and in official offsite venues through January 5, 2020. For more information about The Chicago Architecture Biennial, visit https://chicagoarchitecturebiennial.org/.

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