Latest Data

For more detailed data describing the pandemic in Chicago, please visit the COVID Daily Dashboard.

All data presented on this page, except where otherwise noted, are available through the Chicago Data Portal.

Testing of Chicago Residents

There are several different types of tests that can be used to determine if someone has or has had COVID-19. The Chicago Department of Public Health counts the number of Chicago residents tested based on molecular tests (PCR) because they are the most accurate to identify current COVID-19 infections and are more completely reported to Public Health. This means that some cases identified by other methods may not be counted.

The availability of tests and number of people tested has increased significantly since the beginning of the epidemic.

This graph shows the total number of tests done (gray bars), even if someone has been tested multiple times. The test positivity rate (blue line) is the number of positive tests divided by the total number of tests done on a particular day. The number of tests and test positivity are averaged over 7 days to smooth out the dips that occur when testing numbers decrease on weekends. It can take several days for laboratory results to be reported to CDPH.

What to look for: The goal is to have the total number of tests above 4,500 per day and the positivity rate below 5.0%.


Confirmed Cases

A confirmed case is a Chicago resident who has a positive PCR test.

The bars in this graph show the number of confirmed cases who have tested positive per day based on the day that they were tested, called the specimen collection date.

The line is the average number of cases per day based on the past 7 days. Using an average smooths out the dips that occur when testing numbers decrease on the weekends.

COVID-19 has impacted age, gender and race-ethnicity groups in Chicago differently. By monitoring the demographics of confirmed cases, CDPH can provide resources where they are needed most. For detailed information by age, gender and race-ethnicity, please visit the COVID Daily Dashboard.

What to look for: The goal is to have the line below 200 average cases per day.


Severe Outcomes

Many confirmed cases have no symptoms or mild illness. However, by looking at severe outcomes, such as those who are hospitalized or die, we are measuring those people who become very sick.

The first graph shows the number of confirmed Chicago resident cases who enter the hospital on each day. The line is the average number of hospitalizations per day based on the past 7 days.

The second graph shows the number of deaths that occur among confirmed Chicago resident cases each day. The line is the average number of deaths per day based on the past 7 days.

What to look for: Decreasing numbers of hospitalizations and deaths.


 

 

Hospital Capacity

Chicago hospitals are required to report bed and ventilator capacity, availability and occupancy to CDPH daily for all patients regardless of whether they live in Chicago. This ensures that the healthcare system in Chicago is able to keep up with the demand for services. The number in the center of each graph is the number of COVID-19 patients. This includes patients with laboratory confirmation of COVID-19 and those admitted with suspected COVID, but for whom a test result is pending.

Acute non-ICU beds are hospital beds not in the Intensive Care Unit. ICU beds are those in the Intensive Care Unit. These patients tend to be sicker. Ventilators are machines that help people breathe if they can't breathe on their own. 

Capacity is the total number of beds or ventilators, the number occupied plus the number available. Some of the hospital beds and ventilators are being used by those with COVID-19, but some are being used by those with other conditions (non-COVID-19).

For additional hospital capacity details, please visit the Hospital Capacity page.

What to look for: 

Fewer than 1,000 acute non-ICU hospital beds occupied by COVID-19 patients.

Fewer than 400 ICU beds occupied by COVID-19 patients.

Fewer than 300 ventilators in use by COVID-19 patients.


What is happening beyond Chicago

Keeping up with what is happening in Illinois, the U.S. at large, and globally helps to inform recommendations for travel and provides a big picture of the epidemic.

Numbers reported by different sources may differ due to definitions of COVID-19-related cases and deaths, sources used, how cases and deaths are associated to a specific date, and similar factors.

Data sources: Global- WHO U.S.- COVID Tracking Project IL/Cook- IDPH (Historical data are here) 
COVID-19 Reports