Managing Your Health

What Are Your Chances of Getting COVID-19?

Click the button below to assess your risk.

 


My COVID-19 Risk: THINK TWICE

 


STEP ONE:

Think about yourself and all the people with whom you have close contact:

 

Is everyone under age 60?
Is everyone healthy, without underlying medical conditions?

STEP TWO:

Think about the public activity: 

Can you avoid crowds or close interaction with people you do not know?
Can you always keep 6-foot distance from others?
Can you always wear a mask? (And can everyone else?)
Is the activity outdoors?
*Scroll to see full table
 

STEP ONE

Step 2
YES TO ALL QUESTIONS NO TO SOME QUESTIONS NO TO MOST OR ALL QUESTIONS

STEP TWO

NO TO MOST OR ALL QUESTIONS

Higher

 

 

     AVOID
NON-ESSENTIAL
ACTIVITIES
NO TO SOME QUESTIONS Public Activity Risk      
YES TO ALL QUESTIONS Lower      
    <  Lower Severe Outcome Risk  Higher >

 

 

Continue COVID-19 precautions

 

Consider avoiding non-essential activities

 

Avoid non-essential activities

 

People over 60 and people with underlying medical conditions are more likely to be hospitalized or die if they are infected with COVID-19. No activity that includes interactions with other people is entirely without risk, and younger people without underlying medical conditions can also have severe outcomes from COVID-19. This is meant to serve as a guide to informpersonaldecision-making. The risk of infection increases as the number of interactions increases.

 

Know How it Spreads

The virus that causes COVID-19 primarily spreads between people in close contact when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks. You might also get the virus if you touch something with the virus on it, and then touch your mouth, nose, or eyes.

 

Identify Household Members Who Are at Higher Risk

People of all ages can get sick with COVID-19 and it's important for everyone to take preventative measures. However, older adults and people who have serious underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes are at higher risk for developing serious complications from COVID-19 illness and need to take extra precautions. If your household includes one or more vulnerable individuals then all family members should act as if they, themselves, are at higher risk.

 

Take Everyday Preventative Actions

  • Wash your hands oftenwith soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick
  • Put 6ft of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household
  • Wear a face covering when in public and around others
  • Clean and disinfect frequently-touched surfaces daily, like doorknobs, light switches, phones, and faucets
  • Monitor your health dailyand watch for symptoms of COVID-19
  • Avoid large gatherings and crowded spaces
  • If you’re sick, stay home except to get medical care.

Protect Children and Vulnerable Members

  • Choose one or two family members who are not at a higher risk to run the essential errands.
  • Teach children the same things everyone should do to stay healthy. Children and other people can spread the virus even if they don’t show symptoms.
  • Vulnerable members should avoid caring for children and people who are sick. If they must care for the children in their household, the children in their care should not have contact with individuals outside the household.

 

Separate a Household Member Who Is Sick

  • Keep people at higher risk separated from anyone who is sick.
  • Have only one person in the household take care of the person who is sick.
  • Provide a separate bedroom and bathroom for the person who is sick, if possible.
  • If you need to share a bedroom, separate the ill person’s bed.
  • If you need to share a bathroom, clean and disinfect the frequently touched surfaces in the bathroom after each use.
  • Maintain 6 feet between the person who is sick and other family or household members.
  • If you are sick, do not help prepare food. Also, eat separately from the family.

 

Learn more at Centers of Disease Control & Prevention.

Use Chi COVID Coach

You should first use our Chi COVID Coach, an app developed to help you know what to do if you have COVID-19 symptoms. Once you sign up, we’ll check back with you via text message. We'll let you know what you and the other people in your household should do to limit the spread of COVID-19, help you know how long you need to stay separated from others, and give you day-by-day guidance throughout a potential isolation or quarantine period.

Stay home

If you’re sick you must stay home and cannot return to school or work until it has been:

  • at least 10 days since your symptoms first appeared; and,
  • at least 1 day (24 hours) with no fever (without using fever-reducing medications) and improved symptoms, whichever is longer. 

For example, if you have a fever and coughing for 7 days, you need to stay home 3 more days for a total of 10 days. Or, if you have a fever and coughing for 10 days, you need to stay home 1 more day with no fever for a total of 11 days.

Follow these guidelines

If you’re mildly ill and can recover at home, follow the steps below to care for yourself and to help protect other people in your home and community.

  • Stay home except to get medical care
  • Stay away from other people in your home
  • Clean your hands often
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes
  • Wear a face covering if you must be around other people (even at home)
  • Avoid sharing personal household items
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily, like doorknobs, light switches, phones, and faucets
  • Monitor your symptoms
  • Call ahead before visiting your doctor

 Learn more at Centers of Disease Control & Prevention.

 

Caring for someone who is sick

If you’re living with someone who is sick or have been in close contact with a person sick with COVID-19, you need to stay home too and avoid public places for 14 days. Monitor your symptoms and do not go to work or school. If you’re caring for someone sick at home follow these guidelines from the Centers of Disease Control & Prevention.

If you’re an essential worker who has been exposed to COVID-19, you may continue to work, as long as you don’t develop any COVID-19 symptoms. Follow these CDPH recommendations for essential workers.

The best way to get tested is by calling your healthcare provider or conviently ordering self-administered at-home tests. COVID-19 testing is also offered in many pharmacies and healthcare centers. If you don’t have a regular doctor or medical insurance, locate a community health center or visit any of the City of Chicago community-based testing sites.

Locate Community Health Center

Find Community-Based Testing Site


Updated as of 11/17/2020

Who should be tested

Get tested if:

  • You have symptoms of COVID-19 such as fever or chills, cough, difficulty breathing, sore throat, muscle or body aches, new loss of taste or smell, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, diarrhea
  • You have been in contact with someone who is ill, especially if it's someone you live with, a friend or ​acoworker
  • You have recently participated in a high risk activity, such as attending a large gathering or crowded space


When to get tested

  • If you have symptoms, get tested right away. Make an appointment in advance and make sure to stay 6 feet from others and wear a face mask.
  • If you don’t have symptoms, get tested 5-9 days after your last contact with the sick person or since your last high-risk activity.

 

How to get tested

  • At-home: Some private companies offer to send tests directly to your home so you can avoid having to visit a healthcare provider or testing site. These self-collected, at-home tests have been authorized by the FDA. Usually, you fill out a screening questionnaire and – if you are eligible – you will receive a kit with instructions on how to collect and return your sample. Some tests also include a telehealth consultation and results are usually available 1-3 days later.
    Some options are available for free, regardless of your insurance or documentation status. For example, the nose swab from Pixel by LabCorp will bill your health insurance or the federal government (if you are uninsured or undocumented) so you may pay nothing upfront, and health insurance companies are legally not allowed to pass the cost of your COVID-19 test on to you. With some other nasal swabs (like everywell or LetsGetChecked) and saliva options (like Vault or Vitagene), you may have to pay upfront and claim the money back from your insurance, though many are accepted by HSA and FSA plans. This is not an exhaustive list and CDPH does not necessary recommend any specific private company.
  • Your health care provider: Residents are best served when they’re tested by their health care provider, because your health care provider is familiar with your medical history and can provide counselling that helps you understand exactly what your test result means. If you develop any symptoms or think you may have been exposed to COVID-19, call your doctor and ask if you need to be tested. Your doctor will either perform the test at their office or will refer you to a testing site.
  • Community health centers: If you don’t have a health care provider or medical insurance, there are approximately 165 community health centers throughout Chicago, so find one that is close to you at hrsa.gov. No patient will be turned away because of inability to pay. Community health centers provide services regardless of patients’ immigration status and charge for services on a sliding fee scale.
  • Testing Map: Use the City of Chicago’s interactive testing map to find a testing site near you. The map is updated frequently as locations are continuously added. Please note different testing sites might have different requirements. We recommend calling in advance or checking online first. For additional information, see the Illinois Department of Public Health list of testing sites.
  • City of Chicago testing sites:You can visit one of the City’s community-based testing sites. All tests at the City testing sites are offered at no cost to all people regardless of citizenship or insurance status. To pre-register and schedule an appointment please go to: curative.com.

You should get tested for COVID-19 if you have symptoms of possible COVID-19, you have been in contact with someone who is ill, you have been in a large gathering or if you have recently traveled to a high-risk area. CDPH community-based testing sites are intended for those most at risk of COVID-19, and not intended for people with no symptoms who are required to be regularly tested for work or travel.

While you wait for your test results you should stay home and avoid contact with others.

  • If you test positive for COVID-19, you most likely DO currently have an active COVID-19 infection and can give the virus to others. Stay home for 10 days after your symptoms first appeared and at least 24 hours with no fever (without using fever-reducing medications) and improved symptoms, whichever is longer. If at any time you develop severe symptoms, such as difficulty breathing, seek medical care right away and do not wait for results of your test.

    Be sure to tell all your close contacts they need to be in quarantine for 14 days after their last contact with you.

    You may receive a phone call from the City of Chicago’s contact tracers for a phone interview. The call will come from 312-74-COVID (312-742-6843). Please answer this phone call and provide as much detail as possible. Additional information can be found at: gov/contactracing.

  • If you test negative for COVID-19, you most likely DO NOT currently have an active COVID-19 infection. However, even with a negative test result, if you have been in contact with someone with COVID-19, been in a high-risk group setting, or traveled to a high-risk area, you must self-quarantine for 14 days. Stay home, check your temperature twice a day and watch for symptoms of COVID-19.

    If you are symptomatic but have a negative molecular test result for COVID-19, we recommend that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever has resolved without the use of fever- reducing medications and there is improvement in your symptoms.

    It is important to note that if you were a contact to a positive case when you got tested you must remain in quarantine for the full 14 days even if your test results were negative.

Two kinds of tests are available for COVID-19: viral tests and antibody tests.

  • viral test tells you if you have a current infection.
  • An antibody test might tell you if you had a past infection.

Several viral tests, including the Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), rapid point-of-care (POC) molecular tests, and the POC antigen test, have received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are recommended to diagnose current COVID-19 infection.

Antibody EUA - FDA tests are used to detect past COVID-19 infection. Antibody tests should not be used to diagnose a current COVID-19 infection. An antibody test may not show if you have a current COVID-19 infection because it can take 1–3 weeks after infection for your body to make antibodies.

Ask your medical provider about the type of test they provide to confirm viral tests are used to test for current COVID-19 infection.

Whether you test positive or negative for COVID-19, you should take preventive measures to protect yourself and others.

If you test positive for COVID-19, know what protective steps to take if you are sick.

  • Most people have mild COVID-19 illness and can recover at home without medical care. Contact your healthcare provider if your symptoms are getting worse or if you have questions about your health.

If you test negative for COVID-19, you probably were not infected at the time your sample was collected. This does not mean you will not get sick:

  • A negative test result only means that you did not have COVID-19 at the time of testing or that your sample was collected too early in your infection.
  • You could also be exposed to COVID-19 after the test and then get infected and spread the virus to others.
  • If you have symptoms later, you may need another test to determine if you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.

If you get tested even though you don’t have symptoms, you should continue to follow recommended physical (social) distancing practices, such as staying home and staying at least 6 feet away from others when you are outside your home until your test results are back. You should also use a cloth face covering whenever you leave the home and are around others that are not part of your household. If you were a contact to a positive case of COVID-19 you should remain in quarantine at your home and away from others until your results are back and then follow the guidance below based on what those results show.

If you are symptomatic but have a negative molecular test result for COVID-19, we recommend that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever has resolved without the use of fever- reducing medications and there is improvement in your symptoms.

It is important to note that if you were a contact to a positive case when you got tested you must remain in quarantine for the full 14 days even if your test results were negative.

If you test positive for COVID-19, you most likely DO currently have an active COVID-19 infection and can give the virus to others. Stay home for 10 days after your symptoms first appeared and at least 24 hours with no fever (without using fever-reducing medications) and improved symptoms, whichever is longer. If at any time you develop severe symptoms, such as difficulty breathing, seek medical care right away and do not wait for results of your test.

Be sure to tell all your close contacts they need to be in quarantine for 14 days after their last contact with you.

You may receive a phone call from the City of Chicago’s contact tracers for a phone interview. The call will come from 312-74-COVID (312-742-6843). Please answer this phone call and provide as much detail as possible. Additional information can be found at: chicago.gov/contactracing.

The clock resets if you develop symptoms during your isolation period. If you develop symptoms you have to stay isolated at home for at least 1 day after your fever has resolved without the use of fever- reducing medications, AND there is improvement in your respiratory symptoms (e.g., cough, shortness of breath), AND at least 10 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared.

If you were a contact to a positive case and were in quarantine when your symptoms developed you must follow the isolation instructions for people with symptoms.

Since we are still learning more about the novel coronavirus and how long people can remain infectious, all individuals are required to stay 6 feet apart from others and wear a cloth face covering in public regardless of what their test results were or whether they have already been in isolation or quarantine.

Learn more about CDPH Community-Based Testing sites and the up-to-date schedule.

If you are uninsured or do not have a state identification card, you can still receive a COVID-19 test at no cost to you. During pre-registration you will be asked to upload your insurance card or state identification card. The ability to provide this information in no way affects your access to a COVID-19 test. Information provided is strictly used for CDPH insurance and federal government reimbursement purposes only. If you’re not able to upload your information during the pre-registration process, please bring it to your scheduled appointment. 

Pre-registration is strongly recommended, but not required. Please note that onsite registration may cause longer wait times.

  • If you have health insurance, your insurance carrier will be billed for the cost of the test. By law, the insurance company may not charge you any co-pay, deductible, or any out-of-pocket expense for the test.
  • If you do not have health insurance, the federal government will cover the cost of your test if you upload state identification or driver’s license.
  • If you do not upload insurance information or identification, the City of Chicago will pay for your test.

Children (over 1 year old) can be tested at a CDPH Community-Based Testing site. Infants need to see a pediatric doctor. 

Results from CDPH Community-Based Testing sites usually take up to three days. If you provided an email address, be sure to check the email address regularly. Remember, while waiting for your test results you should stay home and avoid contact with others.

If you have not received your test results from a CDPH Community-Based Testing site after 3 days, email support@curativeinc.com or call (312)746-4835. While waiting for test results you should stay home and avoid contact with others.

CDPH Community-Based Testing sites use oral (mouth) swabs, which you administer to yourself. The test is observed by trained personnel. It is a viral test that detects current infection, antibody (or immunity) tests are not available.

Yes, the test is authorized under the FDA’s Emergency Use Authorization (EUA). As of 3/23/2020 we have notified the FDA of our operation and received approval to operate commercial testing.  The test is NOT authorized for at home sample collection.