Healthy Chicago Survey

The Healthy Chicago Survey (HCS) is an annual telephone survey that was launched in 2014 by the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) to better understand the health of Chicagoans.

Information from the HCS is used to:  

  • Identify health concerns for each community in Chicago
  • Understand environmental, neighborhood and social factors associated with health
  • Support the implementation of Healthy Chicago and to develop public health interventions and policies to address health inequities

The HCS collects information on a range of topics including: access to health services, civic engagement, childhood experiences, chronic health conditions, COVID-19, diet, financial security, food security, mental health, neighborhood conditions, physical activity, safety, substance use, violence.

 

Did you receive a letter or postcard in the mail asking you to participate in the Healthy Chicago Survey?

Those invited to participate can complete the Healthy Chicago Survey here: https://www.healthychicagosurvey.org/ 

If you were selected to participate, you might have some questions. Find answers to some of the most common questions on our FAQ page.

If you still have questions, please contact us at healthychicagosurvey@cityofchicago.org

 

Data & Results 

Results from the HCS are shared on the Chicago Health Atlas and published in reports and briefs. Data are provided for Chicago overall and for each of Chicago’s 77 community areas. You’ll also find data stratified by demographics.  

To request a customized data analysis, please complete and submit this form:

Office of Epidemiology Data Request Form

Requests for a de-identified, public use data set can be made by emailing a completed Healthy Chicago Survey Dataset Request Form to epidatarequests@cityofchicago.org.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is this survey about?

A: The Healthy Chicago Survey is an annual survey led by the Chicago Department of Public Health to better understand the health of Chicagoans. In 2017, CDPH partnered with the Ann & Robert Lurie Children’s Hospital to also ask questions about children’s health in Chicago. CDPH works with RTI International to conduct this survey.

Q: How will you use this information?

A: This information will help the Chicago Department of Public Health and its partners measure and monitor progress of its community health improvement plan. The survey provides information to inform CDPH’s policies, programs, education initiatives and public awareness campaigns that will help improve the health of your community.

Q: What kinds of questions are asked?

A: The survey will ask questions about health, health behaviors, access to health and mental health services, and aspects of your neighborhood that impact health.

Q: Why was I selected to participate?

A: This survey is based on randomly selected addresses in Chicago.  Your address was no more likely to be picked that any other address in the city.  Your participation assures that your neighborhood will be represented in the findings of the survey.

Q: Can I volunteer to participate?

A: This survey is based on randomly selected addresses in Chicago and you must be invited to participate. Unfortunately, you cannot volunteer to participate. This is important because it ensures that each neighborhood is fairly represented in our sample.

Q: I’m in good health. Why do I need to participate?

A: To have an accurate picture of the health of Chicagoans, we need to hear from people both in good health and in poor health. Your address was randomly selected and your responses will help the Chicago Department of Public Health better understand how Chicagoans across the city and in your neighborhood are doing.

Q: Are my responses going to be confidential?

A: Your answers are all completely confidential. Your information is handled in a secure and confidential manner. Answers to survey questions are aggregated, which means that no one person’s answers can be traced back to them.

Q: How long will the survey take?

A: The length of the survey depends on how you answer certain questions, but it takes about 15 or 20 minutes for most people.

 

 

 Supporting Information Facts

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