Chicago Department of Public Health announces more MPV (monkeypox) vaccine on the way to city, more vaccine appointments available as eligibility expands

August 18, 2022

media.coronavirus@cityofchicago.org

CHICAGO – The Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) announced today that the City of Chicago will receive up to an additional 20,000 doses of MPV (monkeypox) JYNNEOS vaccine from the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) and will distribute them to clinics across the city over the next week. CDPH also announced that vaccine eligibility has been expanded to include any sexually active bisexual, gay and other men who have sex with men, and transgender persons, and in addition federal health officials have approved a process to stretch availability of the vaccine.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) permitting the JYNNEOS vaccine to be administered by intradermal injection (just under the surface of the skin) rather than into a deeper layer of the skin. This form of vaccine administration is expected to achieve the same immune response and protection while using a smaller dose and expanding the number of doses available to up to five from each vial.

Providers may begin administering vaccine by intradermal injection as soon as this week. As dose availability increases, CDPH encourages those who have previously received one dose of JYNNEOS vaccine to schedule an appointment for a second dose at least 28 days after the first dose to complete the full vaccine course.

“Our MPV vaccine supply continues to increase, and we are pleased to be opening up larger clinics to serve even more Chicagoans, while still working to vaccinate those at highest risk to help stop the spread,” said CDPH Medical Director Janna Kerins, VMD, MPH. “CDPH has been working closely with healthcare providers, clinics, and community-based organizations that work with individuals disconnected from medical services to schedule vaccination appointments.”

Center on Halsted (3656 N. Halsted Street) is offering 500 appointments for vaccinations on Saturday, August 20 from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the CDPH MPV Vaccination Clinic. Registration is required. Appointments can be scheduled using this link: https://events.juvare.com/IL-IDPH/g3fcd/

Additionally, MPV vaccine appointments are now available up to six days per week at three CDPH STI Specialty Clinics around the city by visiting getvaxchi.chicago.gov.

  • Lakeview STI Specialty Clinic, 2849 N. Clark Street, 1st Floor
  • Austin STI Specialty Clinic, 4909 W. Division Street, Suite 411
  • Roseland STI Specialty Clinic, 200 E. 115th Street, 1.5 Floor

CDPH continues to work with providers, community organizations, and venues that primarily serve LGBTQIA+ communities across the city to provide vaccine appointments efficiently and equitably.

Eligibility criteria for the monkeypox vaccine now includes those living in Chicago and Illinois, including students enrolled in Chicago’s universities/colleges, who meet one of the following criteria AND have not previously been infected with MPV:

  • Anyone who has had close physical contacts (e.g., household members or intimate partners) with someone diagnosed with MPV regardless of sex, gender, or sexual orientation.

OR

  • Sexually active bisexual, gay and other men who have sex with men, and transgender persons.

CDPH encourages individuals to consider getting vaccinated if you meet the eligibility criteria or have met recent partners through online applications or social media platforms (such as Grindr, Tinder, or Scruff), or at clubs, raves, sex parties, saunas, or exchange goods or services for sex. And even after getting vaccinated, CDPH recommends still taking precautions, especially if you are at high risk for severe illness from monkeypox.

MPV spreads through close, intimate contact. Symptoms include a rash or sores that can look like pimples or blisters as well as fever, swollen glands or lymph nodes, headache, and fatigue. If you or your partners have recently been sick, currently feel sick, or have a new or unexplained rash or sores, see a healthcare provider.

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